Pleased to mead you

Traveling through Colorado last month, I was shocked at the number of restaurants that offered local mead by the glass. Too bad each one sampled was disgustingly sweet, like the vile corn-syrup base in fruit cocktail. Each one, that is, except the King Arthur line from Meadery of the Rockies.

Their pale, straw yellow nectar was light and dry, like a good Gewürztraminer, and we brought some home to share with our beekeeping comrade Ringo, hoping to prod him into cooking up a batch.

But Ringo beat us to the punch. At our last get-together, he surprised us with a bottle from his first foray into fermentation. We’d been waiting for the right time to open it, and Sunday’s gorgeous but oppressively hot night screamed it was mead o’clock.

It. Was. Delicious. Light and smooth, with a nice honey finish. Quite, um, potent too. Had to put the rest in the fridge after a second glass to avoid looking like this.

Our area’s never really been known for its refined beverages, but that’s beginning to change. Not just with talented hobbyists, but with for-real businesses like Phenix City’s Chattahoochee Brewing Company, Americus’ Thirteenth Colony Distillery, and Richland Rum,

Columbus peeps, check them out next time you’re planning a soiree, and help reduce your carbon footprint on the dance floor. And to our blog readers around the world, what craft blend is your region known for?

2 Comments

  • June 19, 2013

    Ringo

    Jenn – Really glad you liked the mead, but life is a learning process and I’m still looking to improve. Got various metheglin and melomel in the works and about to start a sparkling mead with some fresh spring honey. Still up for being my guinea pig?

    Meadery of the Ringo.

  • June 20, 2013

    Jenn

    Hells, yeah. Bring on the magic elixir!

You must be logged in to post a comment